Monday, May 2, 2016

Advisory: Mediation today to avert strike in Cavite EPZA factory

MEDIA ADVISORY
May 3, 2016
Contact: Dennis Sequena @ 09301803072

Mediation today to avert strike in Cavite EPZA factory
WHAT: Mediation meeting called by DOLE between union and management of Korean-owned factory
WHEN: Today, May 3, 2016, 10:00 a.m.
WHERE: NCMB Imus @ MYP GBY Building, Bayan Luma 7, Aguinaldo Highway
DETAILS:  The Department of Labor and Employment is convening a meeting between the union and management to avert another strike at the Seung Yeun Technology Industries Corp. (SYTIC).
Last Sunday a majority of the SYTIC union members voted yes in a strike ballot. The union, which comprise a majority of the workers and is in the process of being certified as the sole and exclusive bargaining agent, asserts that the closure is illegal because it is intended to subvert the exercise of freedom of association and bust the union.
An earlier five-day strike in April by SYTIC workers ended in a victory with 18 workers, who were illegally terminated for union activities, reinstated back to work. However, the company later filed for permanent closure which the union is contesting is a union busting scheme.

Cavite EPZA electronics subcon on verge of strike anew


A factory in the Cavite EPZA, the country’s biggest export zone, which supplies parts for big US electronics companies is on the verge of another strike as workers voted to authorize a work stoppage. A majority of the union members at the Korean-owned Seung Yeun Technology Industries Corp. (SYTIC) voted yes in the strike ballot yesterday.

Just after participating in the Labor Day commemoration held by the militant Partido Manggagawa (PM) in the town of Rosario, a stone’s throw away from the Cavite EPZA, SYTIC workers authorized the holding of a strike in response to union busting and illegal closure by management.

An earlier five-day strike in April by SYTIC workers ended in a victory with 18 workers, who were illegally terminated for union activities, reinstated back to work. However, the company later filed for permanent closure which the union is contesting is a union busting scheme.

“In the conciliation meeting called by the Department of Labor and Employment last Thursday, it was manifested by management that SYTIC has orders from its multinational electronics customers for the next several months and thus there is no valid reason to shutdown. It is as clear as the summer sun that closure is a maneuver to break the newly-formed union. We won the first round of the fight. We will win the second as well,” averred Frederick Bayot, president of the SYTIC Workers Association.

“Management is offering a separation package and then rehiring of the present workforce as contractuals for the succeeding months of operation. SYTIC workers are now dealing with the complex crime of union busting and labor contractualization,” Bayot eleborated.

Rene Magtubo, PM chair and partyist nominees, added that “Would the presidentiables who all promised to end endo offer their help to the SYTIC workers facing the threat of contractualization? Sino ang may tapang, may puso may talino at may malasakit para sa mga manggagawang bagong biktima ng epidemya ng kontraktwalisasyon?”

In the commemoration of Labor Day by the PM chapter in Cavite yesterday, some 1,000 factory workers and urban poor assembled to demand regular jobs, a living wage, lower prices and decent social services. The four workers’ demands is dubbed by PM as “Apat na Dapat.”

Cavite EPZA workers who participated in the Labor Day activity pledged support for the “round two” of the fight of SYTIC workers. “Ang laban ng SYTIC workers ay laban ng lahat ng EPZA workers,” insisted Magtubo. The former union president of Fortune Tobacco Corp. committed to mobilize solidarity from the labor movement in the country and abroad.


SYTIC manufactures plastic products that provide protection to integrated circuits and electronic components from physical and electrostatic discharge during storage and shipping. Its three biggest customers are ON Semiconductor Philippines Inc. in Carmona, Cavite, Analog Devices General Trias Inc. in the Gateway Business Park in General Trias, Cavite and Texas Instruments factories in Baguio and Clark ecozones. All are local subsidiaries of US multinational companies. ON Semiconductor is a spinoff of Motorola. SYTIC also supplies to Cavite-based factories of local subsidiaries of US electronics companies Maxim Integrated and Cypress. It exports part of its production to C-Pak Cergas in Malaysia.

May 2, 2016

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Advisory: DOLE mediates brewing dispute as Cavite EPZA factory threatens closure

MEDIA ADVISORY
April 27, 2016
Contact: Dennis Sequena @ 09301803072

DOLE mediates brewing dispute
as Cavite EPZA factory workers restive anew
WHAT: Mediation meeting called by DOLE between union and management of Korean-owned factory
WHEN: Tomorrow, April 28, 2016, 10:00 a.m.
WHERE: NCMB Imus @ MYP GBY Building, Bayan Luma 7, Aguinaldo Highway
DETAILS:  With just a few days to go until Labor Day, a new labor dispute is brewing in the Seung Yeun Technology Industries Corp. (SYTIC), an electronics subcon in the Cavite EPZA. The Department of Labor and Employment is convening a meeting between the union and management to avert another strike.
After 18 workers earlier dismissed for union activities were reinstated as part of an agreement to end a five-day strike two weeks ago, the management of SYTIC is pushing through with the shutdown of the company on May 4.
The SYTIC labor union, which comprise a majority of the workers and is in the process of being certified as the sole and exclusive bargaining agent, asserts that the closure is illegal because it is intended to subvert the exercise of freedom of association and bust the union.
In response, the SYTIC union has called for negotiations with management about the impending closure and the reported takeover by its customer C-Pak Pte Ltd, a Singaporean company. Moreover the SYTIC union is calling for the absorption of the present employees into the new company, should the takeover push through. C-Pak Pte Ltd is owned by the group Dou Yee of Singapore. ###

SYTIC workers fight continues as company plans to shutdown

 

The workers of Seung Yeun Technology Industries Corp. (SYTIC), a subcontractor for big US electronics companies and is based in the Philippines’ biggest export zone, are once more facing a fight in their exercise of freedom of association. After 18 workers earlier dismissed for union activities were reinstated as part of an agreement to end a five-day strike, the management of SYTIC is pushing through with the shutdown of the company. Last April 25, management filed for permanent closure.

The SYTIC labor union , which comprise a majority of the workers and is in the process of being certified as the sole and exclusive bargaining agent, asserts that the closure is illegal because it is intended to subvert the exercise of freedom of association and bust the union.

In response, the SYTIC union has called for negotiations with management about the impending closure and the reported takeover by its customer C-Pak Pte Ltd, a Singaporean company. Moreover the SYTIC union is calling for the absorption of the present employees into the new company, should the takeover push through. C-Pak Pte Ltd is owned by the group Dou Yee of Singapore.

The Labor Department has called for a conciliation meeting on April 28 in an affort to resolve the brewing labor dispute. In the meeting, the union will table its twin demand of absorption of the present employees and their participation in the transition talks between SYTIC and C-Pak. The union’s call to participate in the transition talks is in line with the provision of the Philippine Constitution that workers shall be afforded the right to participate in policy and decision-making processes affecting their rights and benefits.

April 26, 2016

Monday, April 25, 2016

Presidentiables dared to offer policy steps to end endo


The partylist group Partido Manggagawa (PM) dared presidential candidates to propose policy steps to follow through on their commitment to stop contractualization. In a televised presidential debate last night, all five candidates promised to “end endo.”

“It is obvious that the presidentiables played to the crowd by declaring their intent to end endo but it was all too clear that they gave no concrete proposals on regulating much less eradicating the epidemic of contractualization. Either they have a shallow or erroneous understanding of the roots of contractualization,” averred Rene Magtubo, chair of PM and also its first nominee for the partylist elections.

“In deeds not by words should the presidentiables be judged on the issue of contractualization,” insisted Magtubo. PM, along with other labor groups, have been campaigning for the passage of the Security of Tenure bill that has languished in Congress for nearly a decade.  The bill seeks to regulate contractualization by setting a cap on the number of non-regular workers and amending provisions of the Labor Code on subcontracting and outsourcing.

The group noted that none of the presidentiables who are solons pushed for the Security of Tenure bill while those who are local executives employ job order workers, the equivalent of contractual employees in the public sector, in their city halls.

“Mar Roxas deserves special mention for countenancing the outsourcing of Philippine Airlines employees in 2011 while he was cabinet secretary and threatening to file economic sabotage against PALEA members who fought contractualization in the national flag carrier,” stated Gerry Rivera, PALEA president and also PM partylist nominee.

He added that the “Contrary to the misconception of a few presidentiables, contractualization is expressly allowed by the law and is merely regulated but not prohibited. Moreover, lax inspection and enforcement by the Department of Labor and Employment worsens the situation.”

“This stems from the view of government that employers have to be encourged to invest and shifting from regular to contractual labor is part of the package. Thus it is worrisome that even as the presidentiables profess desire to end endo, in the same breath they want to placate employers by providing more incentives. We won’t be surprised that whoever becomes president will simply cave in to the employers’ lobby on the alibi that contractualization is necessary to generate more investments,” Rivera elaborated.

April 25, 2016